From the Front Lines to the Aftermath

Mental-Health-and-the-Law

 

Partner Agency (Greene County Juvenile, Greene County Children’s Division, CASA, Clark Center and Burrell) please click HERE to register.


Burrell Behavioral Health, Missouri Children’s Trust Fund and Community Foundation of the Ozarks are pleased to announce the program for this stellar conference event. Nearly a year of planning has gone into bringing together a diverse group of individuals dedicated to helping Missourians in addressing the very real problems related to child abuse, neglect, and trauma. As the title of the conference indicates, agencies working with this population are fully aware of the daily battles faced by those who are on the prevention front, and those who are dealing with the aftermath. Ayn Rand said “Check your road and the nature of your battle. The world you desired can be won, it exists, it is real, it is possible, it’s yours.” It is the sincere hope of each organization involved that this conference will help professionals with the daily combats they witness – that their vision remains undistorted by the ugly, the cowardly and the mindless – and that they discover additional tools which allow them to continue to make a difference. We’re pleased you have chosen a vocation that embraces the value of keeping our children safe, healthy and happy!

The Planning Committee
Burrell Behavioral Health
Greene County Juvenile Office
Clark Center
CASA
Greene County Children’s Division

GENERAL INFORMATION

Who Should Attend:

Anyone working in the social services industry and those impacted by trauma, abuse and neglect, will find this conference helpful in addressing prevention and treatment strategies, as well as finding opportunities for personal and professional growth. This includes mental health and healthcare professionals, juvenile services professionals, law enforcement, family services professionals, social workers, educators, case workers, community support workers, administrators, volunteers, students, and family specialists.

Continuing Education Credits

Burrell Behavioral Health is committed to an ongoing process consisting of formal learning activities that (1) are relevant to psychological practice, education and science, (2) enable psychologists to keep pace with emerging issues and technologies, and (3) allow psychologists to maintain, develop, and increase competencies in order to improve services to the public and enhance contributions to the profession.

Burrell is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Burrell maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This two day conference is approved for 12 hours of continuing education. Each session is to be considered an intermediate to advanced level of training.

For questions regarding educational credit please contact Johnelle Ethridge, Education Coordinator at 417-761-5025 or via email at Johnelle.Ethridge@burrellcenter.com.

Accreditation approval only refers to these educational activities and does not imply endorsement of any commercial products by Burrell Behavioral Health or any other participating organization.

Participants will receive statements of credit at the end of the program when all requirements for credit have been met. Satisfactory completion of objectives will occur through program attendance. Therefore contact hours will be given only for hours the participant attends. In order to receive a statement of credit, all participants must sign-in at the registration desk and turn in a completed evaluation form at the end of the program. Continuing education statements will be e-mailed within 30 days to participants who complete and return evaluation forms and sign in on the program roster.

Conference at a Glance

April 14-15, 2016

8:00 am – 8:30 am Registration Open
8:30 am –11:45 am Morning Sessions
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm Lunch (provided)
1:15 pm – 4:30 pm Afternoon Sessions

Thursday, April 14, 2016


Track 1 — Prevention Morning Session

The Impact of Domestic Violence on Children

Rod Reder, BA

8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Arizona Room

Children and youth who are exposed to domestic violence experience emotional, mental, and social damage that can affect their developmental growth. Some children lose the ability to feel empathy for others. Others feel socially isolated, unable to make friends as easily due to social discomfort or confusion over what is acceptable. Some will repeat the cycle of violence as they reach adulthood. In order to respond to the overwhelming issues associated with domestic violence, child welfare professionals need to understand these issues and know how to identify them as well as assess and provide treatment to children and youth affected by domestic violence. This segment investigates the effects of domestic violence on children. Attendees will see a video of a young man who was a victim of child abuse and hear from him how important law enforcement intervention is to children. They will see how family violence affects children even if they are not victims of child abuse. Participants will learn how to provide effective intervention and why it is important.
 
Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe the Hierarchy of Brain Function in children;
2. Explain how children exposed to violence undergo lasting mental, emotional and physical harm;
3. Demonstrate at least two strategies designed to keep children safe.

 


Track 2 – Aftermath Morning Session (Part 1 of 4)

Attachment, Self-regulation and Competency (ARC): A Comprehensive Framework for Intervention with Complexly Traumatized Youth

Hilary Hodgdon, PhD

8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Iowa Room

As many as one in four youth will experience a potentially traumatic exposure, and many of these will be multiple or prolonged. The impact of these stressors is far-reaching, and often repeats across generations as yesterday’s impacted children become tomorrow’s parents and caregivers. Establishing effective practice for this population is a priority, but is challenging, given their diverse histories, their varied presentations, the multifaceted contextual, cultural, and developmental influences which shape them, and the wide range of systems within which they seek care. The Attachment, Self-Regulation, and Competency (ARC) (Kinniburgh & Blaustein, 2005; Blaustein & Kinniburgh, 2010) framework is a core-components treatment model, developed to provide a guiding framework for thoughtful clinical intervention with complexly traumatized youth and their caregiving systems. Drawing from the fields of trauma, attachment, and child development, the framework recognizes the importance of working with the child-in-context, of acknowledging the role of historical experiences and adaptive responses in current presentation, and of intervening with the surrounding environment – whether primary caregivers or treatment system – to support and facilitate the child’s healthy growth and development. Rather than identify step-by-step intervention strategies, the framework identifies 10 key “building blocks”, or intervention targets, key skills/goals within each domain, developmental and cultural considerations, and potential applications across settings.

Attendance at all 4 sessions for the Trauma Track is required for those selecting this conference track.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Define complex trauma and identify at least 3 consequences of early complex trauma exposure;
2. Identify and briefly describe the 3 domains of the ARC framework;
3. Identify and briefly describe the 8 core targets of the ARC framework; and
4. Identify and briefly describe the role of routines and psychoeducation in trauma-informed practice.

 


Lunch

12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

 


Track 1 — Prevention Afternoon Session

If Orange is the New Black, What is the New Normal?

Laura Frost, MSW, LMSW, and Todd Williams, BA

1:15 to 4:30 p.m.
Arizona Room

This workshop will focus on defining what is considered “normal” as that term relates to normal sexual behavior/exploration, normal rebellion, normal development stages, etc. It will also cover how labeling children can have a negative impact for years, and even a lifetime. As professionals, we must remain objective while reading children’s histories and in formulating our own decisions instead of relying on common labels (sexual offender, incorrigible, etc.) We will discuss how to make conscious decisions to avoid tagging children, despite what appears to be a never-ending cycle of psychologically damaged and physically scarred children we encounter in our respective professions. We will also discuss appropriate resources in the State of Missouri for children who have indeed crossed the threshold of acceptable behavior and require more intensive services to regain normalcy — in a world that has likely offered them anything but.
 
Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1 Describe normal in terms of sexual behavior, rebellion and development in youth ages 3 to 18;
2. Analyze case histories objectively and avoid the label trap; and
3. List at least two area services/programs available for children impacted by abuse and neglect.

 


Track 2 – Aftermath Afternoon Session (Part 2 of 4)

Attachment, Self-regulation and Competency (ARC): A Comprehensive Framework for Intervention with Complexly Traumatized Youth

Hilary Hodgdon, PhD

1:15 to 4:30 p.m.
Iowa Room

See description provided for morning session.
 
Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Identify key members of the caregiving system within the participant’s own system and / or with their client population;
2. Identify at least one way that the core attachment targets apply to the participant and/or providers within the participant’s system; and
3. Identify one way to support safe caregiving systems for trauma-impacted youth.

 


 

Friday, April 15, 2016


Track 1 — Prevention Morning Session

Supporting the Self-Determination of Transitional Age Youth

Mathew Gass, MSW, LCSW

8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Arizona Room

The transitional age has received a great deal of focus recently, and discussions around this age group often begin with the challenges and frustrations that leave families and providers wondering, “What do I do now?” Often family members and caregivers are unsure of their new roles as supporters of young adults and not caregivers of children, and find themselves ill prepared to address the needs of this population. Participants will be challenged to take a greater look at their own communication skills and support strategies as they themselves prepare to adapt their practices to an ever growing technologically diverse age group. We’ll discuss strategies to support youth and their families around lifestyle choices, to include work or furthering their education through supported employment and education services. The overarching goal is to empower the transitional age to find their successes in life through compassionate purposeful intervention.
 
Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Identify the differences and challenges specific to the Transitional Age Youth population;
2. List at least three supports available to youth with mental health conditions seeking education and employment supports; and
3. Discuss the factors to promote recovery from mental health conditions and be better prepared to address issues and concerns that will arise while working with transitional age youth, their families and caregivers.

 


Track 2 – Aftermath Morning Session (Part 3 of 4)

Attachment, Self-regulation and Competency (ARC): A Comprehensive Framework for Intervention with Complexly Traumatized Youth

Hilary Hodgdon, PhD

8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Iowa Room

See description provided for Thursday morning session.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Compare and contrast at least two patterns of youth dysregulation, including function of the adaptation;
2. Identify at least two key targets of intervention for supporting youth regulation;
3. Identify at least 2 activities that can be used to support regulation; and
4. Identify and describe at least one aspect of self and identity that may be impacted in trauma-exposed youth.

 


Lunch

12:00 to 1:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

 


Track 1 — Prevention Afternoon Session

Primary Prevention: Supporting the Developmental Trajectory of Non-Abusive Human Functioning

Gail Ryan, MA

1:15 to 4:30 p.m.
Arizona Room

Children are not born abusive. There is no evidence that abusers are inherently different from the rest of us at birth: Genetically, Physically, or Neurologically. Even the most deviant or dysfunctional person must have the ‘capacity to be abusive’ to overcome the natural, social, spiritual, and legal prohibitions against abusing others. Studying those who have been abusive enabled us to identify factors associated with the ‘capacity to abuse’ and to then look at the developmental trajectory relevant to those factors. Research regarding those factors now informs well-grounded hypotheses regarding a life span approach to primary and secondary ‘Perpetration Prevention’ strategies.
 
Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe the sources which are the basis for perpetration prevention hypotheses;
2. List the developmental risk factors for developing a “capacity to be abusive”; and
3. Apply primary and secondary prevention and intervention strategies.

 


Track 2 – Aftermath Afternoon Session (Part 4 of 4)

Attachment, Self-regulation and Competency (ARC): A Comprehensive Framework for Intervention with Complexly Traumatized Youth

Hilary Hodgdon, PhD

1:15 to 4:30 p.m.
Iowa Room

See description provided for Thursday morning session.
 
Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe one “entry point” for supporting decision-making in youth;
2. Identify at least one strategy or activity that can be used to target executive functioning; and
3. Describe at least one phase of trauma experience integration, as defined by the ARC framework.

 

Ellis

Laura Frost, MSW, LCSW

earned a Bachelor of Science from Abilene Christian University in 1990 and later completed the requirements for a Master of Social Work Degree in July 2013 at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Laura’s experience in the delivery of behavioral health care includes training in Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with significant experience working with children and adults who have been impacted by trauma. In her practice, Laura employs Dialectical Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Therapies and implements creative and strategic treatment planning modalities to meet the individual needs of her clients. Laura has extensive experience in the delivery of behavioral health services to teens and young adults and has worked with a variety of diagnoses including PTSD, Borderline Depression, Anxiety, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, and more. Laura is currently a member of Burrell Behavioral Health’s Assertive Community Treatment team for Transitional Age Youth serving teens and young adults in Columbia, MO and surrounding communities.


Ellis

Mathew Gass, MSW, LCSW

holds a bachelor’s degree in biology and a master’s degree in social work from the University of Missouri. Mathew is currently the Director of Transitions at Burrell Behavioral Health, which includes oversight of adult community support services and the Transitional Age Youth ACT Team. In addition to his professional experience with Burrell, he has built a career working with children in residential care and adults with developmental disabilities.


Ellis

Hilary Hodgdon, PhD

is a practicing clinical psychologist specializing in the assessment and treatment of complex trauma in children, adolescents and adults. Dr. Hodgdon is the Director of Research Operations at the Trauma Center, where she oversees treatment outcome research on novel interventions for children, youth and adults suffering from symptoms related to traumatic stress. Dr. Hodgdon is the Associate Director of the Complex Trauma Treatment Network, a SAMSHA Category II training and technical assistance network housed at the Trauma Center. Dr. Hodgdon is a certified trainer in the Child Welfare Toolkit and Resource Parent Curriculums of the NCTSN and the Attachment, Regulation and Competency (ARC) treatment framework for children with complex trauma. Dr. Hodgdon has provided training in the neurobiology and developmental impact of complex trauma and evidenced based interventions for traumatic stress to a variety of provider groups including social workers, mental health practitioners, and administrative, milieu and nursing staff at outpatient, residential, inpatient and community mental health settings. Dr. Hodgdon received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Temple University in Philadelphia. Her research interests center on the crossover of youth from the child welfare to juvenile justice systems, the impact of early trauma on the development of psychopathology across the lifespan, and novel interventions for complex trauma. Dr. Hodgdon is particularly interested in the assessment of children and youth involved in foster care and in issues related to the overlap between the mental health, child welfare and juvenile justice systems. She is trained in sensory-motor therapy for children (SMART), Eye Movement Desensitization Training (EMDR), EEG biofeedback (Neurofeedback) and Trauma-focused CBT.


Ellis

Rod Reder, BA

is the vice president of the National Institute of Crime Prevention. He served with the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office in Tampa, Florida for 29 years. He retired in 2006 as a Captain-Uniform Deputy Commander. Rod was the Domestic Violence Coordinator for the Sheriff’s Office for seven years. He was also the Public Information Officer for five years. He has conducted training for Florida State University, the University of South Florida, KY Attorney General’s Office and the U.S. Army. He was also part of a training team that established the first domestic violence training program for police in Almaty, Kazakhstan. He currently serves on the Florida Attorney General’s Fatality Review Team. Rod is recognized nationwide as a teacher, lecturer and expert in the field of domestic and sexual violence. He has received numerous awards, such as the Florida Governor’s “Peace At Home” award and The Spring’s “Hands of Peace” award. As a member of the Florida Governor’s Domestic Violence Task Force he helped to write many of Florida’s domestic violence statutes. He is the past chair for the board of directors for the Hillsborough County Family Justice Center. He has appeared as an expert on the NBC Today Show, MSNBC News, Investigation Discovery Channel, Court TV, Inside Edition and Fox’s, The O’Reilly Factor. Rod is a certified State of Florida CPTED Practitioner. Rod is an honors’ graduate of the 109th Session of the Southern Police Institute’s Administrative Officer’s Course in Louisville, Kentucky. He also holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Sociology from the University of South Florida.


Ellis

Gail Ryan, MA

is Director of the Perpetration Prevention Program, at the Kempe Center for Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect; University of Colorado School of Medicine in Denver. Ms. Ryan has worked at the Kempe Center since 1975, has worked with abusive parents and abused children, and provided offense specific treatment for 11-17 year old males who had molested children for 20 years. Her primary interests have been in the correlation between early life experience and dysfunctional behaviors, with an emphasis on prevention of the development of abusive behaviors in ‘at-risk’ groups. She retired in 2005, but continues part time as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Dept of Pediatrics; focusing on dissemination using the Kempe curriculum: Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Perpetration Prevention in Childhood and Adolescence. She has trained 100’s of trainers in more than 20 states, to train others in their own communities; and continues to teach a certificate course on treatment of juveniles who have sexually offended using the 3rd edition of the textbook she first edited in 1991: Juvenile Sexual Offending: Causes Consequences and Correction. Other publications include: Childhood Sexuality A guide for parents, and Web of Meaning: A developmental-contextual approach in sexual abuse treatment.


Ellis

Todd Williams, BA

earned a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1988. Upon graduating, Todd took a position with the Greene County Juvenile office where he served as a Deputy Juvenile Officer and later became Assistant Superintendent of Detention. Todd was later hired by the Springfield Public School District where he continued to work with children and youth. Todd joined Burrell Behavioral Health over eighteen years ago and currently holds the titles of Placement Coordinator for Children’s Residential Services and Community Support Specialist. Todd is frequently invited to share his expertise on issues of outpatient and residential treatment options for youth, and related themes, at local and statewide events. He most recently presented on mental health issues pertaining to youth and adolescents at the National Alliance on Mental Illness’ (NAMI) State Conference. In 2012, Todd’s unyielding dedication and service to abused, neglected, and unloved children earned him the NAMI-Southwest Missouri Youth Mental Health Professional of the Year Award. It is the children and adolescents who have lost nearly all their faith in what is good, and whose eyes flicker with doubt, mistrust, and sadness, that Todd works tirelessly to help each day. These youth trust him, for all the right reasons. Faithful, steadfast, caring, and kind — with good humor added. That is the Todd Williams they are drawn toward, and the one who has selected a life of service to these youth, their families, and the community.

Hotel Reservations

RamadaFrom the Front Lines to the Aftermath Conference will be held at the University Plaza Hotel Convention Center, Springfield, Missouri

Located in the heart of downtown Springfield – surrounded by great restaurants, lounges and coffee shops – this first class hotel has terrific resort-style amenities like a fitness center, whirlpool, sundeck and indoor and outdoor pools.

Special Room Rates

We have special room rates for conference at $89 (plus applicable taxes) single/double.

Call the reservations department at 417.864.7333 and be sure to ask for the Burrell “From the Front Lines” conference block to receive the discounted conference rate.

Click here to make your reservations now, and use online booking code BBHMH for the discounted rate option

NOTE: Rooms at the special rate are subject to availability and sell out quickly! Hotel reservations are separate from conference registration and must be booked and paid for separately.

University Plaza

See their website and take a tour of the hotel at: http://www.upspringfield.com/

University Plaza Hotel
333 John Q. Hammons Parkway
Springfield MO 65806

Hotel Phone: 417.864.7333
Hotel Fax: 417.831.5893