Intersections, Forks and Turn Lanes: Navigating the Roads of Disability Services

mindfulness

 

OVERVIEW

Burrell Behavioral Health, Abilities First, Arc of the Ozarks, Easter Seals Life Skills and the Missouri Department of Mental Health are pleased to announce the program for this stellar conference event. A year of planning has gone into bringing together a diverse group of individuals dedicated to helping persons with disabilities and their families. As the title of the conference indicates, agencies working with this population are fully aware of the many divergent paths and often confusing roadmap to receiving needed services. Henry Miller once said “One’s destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things.” It is the sincere hope of each organization involved that this conference will help professionals and families obtain the information they need to avoid the pitfalls and potholes in the road to improved living for those with disabilities — to have the information provided over the course of these two days allow you to see things in a new way — and, most of all, to celebrate the journey. While we have a long way to go to truly successful collaboration of services, this conference will serve to highlight just how far we have already traveled. We’re glad to have you as our travel companion the next few days!

The Planning Committee

 

INTERESTED VENDORS – PLEASE CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION

 

GENERAL INFORMATION

Who Should Attend:

Anyone working with those with disabilities, as well as family members of those impacted by disabilities, will find this conference helpful in addressing concerns and finding opportunities for enhancement of services and systems, as well as personal and professional growth. This includes mental health and healthcare professionals, disability professionals, occupational therapists, social workers, educators, case workers, community support workers, administrators, volunteers, students, disability specialists and representatives of disability organizations, parents, siblings and grandparents.

Continuing Education Credits

Burrell Behavioral Health is committed to an ongoing process consisting of formal learning activities that (1) are relevant to psychological and occupational therapy practice, education and science, (2) enable psychologists and occupational therapists to keep pace with emerging issues and technologies, and (3) allow psychologists and occupational therapists to maintain, develop, and increase competencies in order to improve services to the public and enhance contributions to the profession.

Burrell is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Burrell maintains responsibility for the program and its content. This two day conference is approved for 12 hours of continuing education. This workshop is to be considered an intermediate to advanced level of training.

Burrell is approved by the American Occupational Therapy Association to sponsor continuing education for occupational therapists. All workshops in this conference, with the exception of the “Don’t Take the Wrong Path for Your Special Needs Family,” are to be considered intermediate level of training. Each workshop will provide .3 Category 1 AOTA CEU’s and morning plenary sessions will offer .9 Category 1 AOTA CEU’s.

For questions regarding educational credit please contact Johnelle Ethridge, Education Coordinator at 417-761-5025 or via email at Johnelle.Ethridge@burrellcenter.com.

Accreditation approval only refers to these educational activities and does not imply endorsement of any commercial products by Burrell Behavioral Health or any other participating organization.

Participants will receive statements of credit at the end of the program when all requirements for credit have been met. Satisfactory completion of objectives will occur through program attendance. Therefore contact hours will be given only for hours the participant attends. In order to receive a statement of credit, all participants must sign-in at the registration desk and turn in a completed evaluation form at the end of the program. Continuing education statements will be e-mailed within 30 days to participants

Conference at a Glance

Thursday, April 16

7:30 am – 8:30 am Registration Opens
7:30 am – 5:00 pm Exhibits Open
7:30 am – 5:00 pm Childcare Area Open
8:45 am –12:00 noon Morning Plenary
12:00 noon – 1:30 pm Lunch (provided)
1:30 pm – 5:00 pm Afternoon workshops
5:00 pm – 6:30 pm Art Show and Evening Reception

Friday, April 17

7:30 am – 5:00 pm Exhibits Open
7:30 am – 5:00 pm Childcare Area Open
8:45 am –12:00 noon Morning Plenary
12:00 noon – 1:30 pm Lunch (provided)
1:30 pm – 5:00 pm Afternoon workshops

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Morning Plenary – The Strength of Support

Rachel Simon, MFA, author

8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Colorado Room

How do we help people with intellectual and developmental disabilities live lives with meaning, dignity, and respect, fulfilling their innate potential? And what is the role that siblings can play throughout an individual’s life? Rachel Simon’s books illustrate these themes. Using original artwork, family photos, and archival photos, Rachel will discuss our shared history, her personal history, and how we can all make a difference. This workshop touches on many issues familiar to those in the disability community: the abuse and dehumanizing conditions in the institution, the importance of friends and family, and the value of dedicated Direct Support Professionals. Rachel also weaves in issues such as the right to community living, romance, self-expression, spirituality, and independence.Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe the sibling relationship and its significance to the intellectually disabled;
2. Discuss the abuses, both intended and unintended, of those who are intellectually disabled;
3. Explain the significance of friends, family and peers to development of independence;
4. Discuss the importance of direct support professionals and identify ways their contributions enhance the ability of those struggling with intellectual disabilities to lead fulfilling lives; and
5. Discuss the importance of basic needs applicable to all individuals, regardless of diagnosis, including right to community living, romance, self-expression, and spirituality.

 


Lunch

11:45 to 1:00 p.m.
Colorado Room

 


Afternoon Workshops

Titles with * are designed with special focus on parents and caretakers Titles with ** are designed with special focus on professionals

*Inspiring Your Child Through the Arts

Richard White, MA , Jamie McGranahan, BS, and Kelly Shifflet, BS

1:00 to 2:00 p.m.
Iowa Room

Participants will learn how Art Inspired Academy combines theatre, music, dance and art to teach students with developmental disabilities. The AIA team uses relationship based teaching and artistic expression to meet the individual needs of each student. This workshop will lead you through the approach and provide specific examples for how to use art experiences to encourage improvement in the areas of communication, motor skills, social skills, self-control and confidence in your child. Instructors will demonstrate this approach for individuals of all ages and various disabilities. You will receive hands on instruction in using these techniques in your home and in community settings. Participants will also receive information on accessing arts programs in the southwest Missouri area.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1 Describe relationship based teaching and how it can be used in the home;
2. Use artistic experiences to encourage expression and skill development in your child; and
3. Describe area arts programs and know where to go for support in accessing these programs.

 


**Two Sides of the Same Coin: Behavior and Sensory Processing

Amy Vaughan, OTR/L, BCP –Occupational Therapist

1:00 to 2:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

Regardless of diagnosis, how do you help the child or young adult with poor coping skills and poor functional performance emerge as the uniquely gifted person that they are? How do you shift the focus from disability to ability while continuing to provide needed supports? This session is designed to enhance positive behavioral intervention by expanding on the use of positive reinforcement to include sensory strategies to increase behavioral outcomes and relational interaction. Participants will practice identifying strengths that can be used to build future success as well as recognizing barriers to successful learning and interaction and performance that need to be supported for success. Participants will also receive a tool for positive behavior intervention and treatment planning that helps to identify problem behaviors and reframe them into positive behavioral goals. This tool takes into account a child’s emerging learning style as well as their individual strengths.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to identify benefits of using positive behavior planning as a process for developing positive, measurable intervention goals and practice using a tool to help develop positive intervention strategies;
2. Distinguish between a linear sensory learning situation and a multi-sensory learning situation and identify which teaching strategy to utilize when teaching coping skills information based on a student’s sensory processing profile; and
3. Identify benefits of strength-based learning and practice using a tool to help identify an individual’s sensory learning strengths and barriers.

 


*Unlocking Potential Through Assistive Technology

David Baker, BA, MA, CAP

2:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Iowa Room

Parents of children with disabilities often understand the potential assistive technology has for their children. Often, though, parents are overwhelmed by the number of devices available, understanding funding options, navigating the various education laws that affect assistive technology in schools and identifying resources. This session will be devoted to helping parents identify appropriate assistive technology, understanding the funding and legal issues, and will share information about the best assistive technology resources.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to identify the areas of assistive technology most appropriate for their child’s needs;
2. Be able to describe the various funding sources and laws that guide assistive technology acquisition; and
3. List Missouri and national resources they can turn to for further exploration and guidance.

 


**Guardianship: Understanding the Options and Alternatives

Jane St. John

2:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

There is often an assumption that an individual who has a developmental or other disability, or a mental/behavioral health diagnosis, will need a guardian at age 18. In reality, a person is presumed competent to make choices about their own lives when they are age 18 or older, unless a court says otherwise. This interactive workshop will equip participants with tools to help decide what kind of decision making supports a person might need, and what guardianship alternatives or options might work best for each person’s unique needs and situation. The information and materials presented are relevant for all populations who are considering guardianship issues and concerns, including developmental or other disabilities, mental health diagnosis, or those who are aging.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Discuss how to balance support and protection with autonomy and self-determination;
2. Identify options and alternatives to full/plenary guardianship for the appropriate level of decision-making support and/or protection;
3. Describe how to access alternatives to guardianship, as well as accessing Missouri courts to pursue guardianship options;
4. Be able to describe the various funding sources and laws that guide assistive technology acquisition; and
5. List Missouri and national resources they can turn to for further exploration and guidance.

 


*Two Sides of the Same Coin: Behavior and Sensory Processing in the Home

Amy Vaughan, OTR/L, BCP –Occupational Therapist

3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Iowa Room

Regardless of diagnosis, how do you help the child or young adult with poor coping skills and poor functional performance emerge as the uniquely gifted person that they are? How do you shift the focus from disability to ability while continuing to provide needed supports? This session is designed to enhance positive behavioral intervention by expanding on the use of positive reinforcement to include sensory strategies to increase behavioral outcomes and relational interaction. Participants will practice identifying strengths that can be used to build future success as well as recognizing barriers to successful learning and interaction and performance that need to be supported for success. Participants will also receive a tool for positive behavior intervention and treatment planning that helps to identify problem behaviors and reframe them into positive behavioral goals. This tool takes into account a child’s emerging learning style as well as their individual strengths.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to give examples of how to utilize favorite things (repertoire of reinforcement) to increase a child’s developmental progress and influence quality of life factors;
2. Distinguish between effective and ineffective methods of increasing a child’s social engagement based on a child’s identified sensory processing strengths and barriers; and
3. List at least 2 activities that support learning and generalization of skills.

 


**Inspiring Students Through the Arts

Richard White, MA , Jamie McGranahan, BS, and Kelly Shifflet, BS

3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

Participants will learn how Art Inspired Academy combines theatre, music, dance and art to teach students with developmental disabilities. The AIA team uses relationship based teaching and artistic expression to meet the individual needs of each student. This workshop will lead you through the approach and teach specific techniques for using acting, movement, art and music to enhance the learning experience. Instructors will demonstrate how this approach is adapted to individuals of all ages, various disabilities and in classroom and therapeutic settings. Examples will be given of how to meet the needs of each individual while working in a group setting and facilitating interaction and teamwork. You will receive hands on instruction in innovative techniques to build relationships, improve skills and adapt to every student’s needs.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe and utilize relationship based teaching in the classroom or therapeutic setting;
2. List specific examples to improve client’s skills in areas of communication, motor skills, social skills, self-control and confidence; and
3. Demonstrate methods of artistic experiences to encourage expression in individual students.

 


*Suicide Prevention and Disability

Speaker TBD

4:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Iowa Room

Disability is not a category of disease, but rather relates to the physical, sensory, cognitive and/or mental disorders that substantially limit one or more major life activities. These functional limitations have been found to be predictive of suicide, with psychiatric co-occurring disorders increasing the risk for suicide. While the research is still limited, it is felt that large gaps exist in the understanding of the relationship between disability and suicide. This workshop will explore not only the rates of suicide, but also identification of suicide risk factors, including factors more common for individuals with intellectual disabilities. It will also describe the methods used to prevent suicide to help children and adults with disabilities to lead happier, healthier and longer lives.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe how intellectual disability can contribute to a higher rate of suicide;
2. Identify suicide risk factors, including those more common for individuals with intellectual disabilities; and
3. Explain the best practices in preventing suicide among this vulnerable population.

 


**Enhancing Opportunity Through Assistive Technology

David Baker, BA, MA, CAP

4:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

Assistive technology is an umbrella term used to describe the thousands of devices that can aid people with disabilities in all walks of life. It can also be a life line to success and independence. This session
will introduce participants to the varied array of assistive devices available for individuals with physical, sensory and cognitive disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on the latest devices and trends in assistive technology, along with the ever evolving fusion of mainstream and assistive technologies in the quest for a universally designed world.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe assistive technology and list examples of devices utilized by individuals with physical, sensory and cognitive disabilities;
2. Identify ways that assistive technology can enhance life and expand opportunities for individuals with disabilities; and
3. Explain the assistive technology consideration process.

 


Friday, April 17, 2015

Morning Plenary – Equipping Youth with Disabilities for Adulthood: Promoting Rigor, Relevance and Relationships

Erik Carter, PhD

8:30 to 11:45 a.m.
Colorado Room

This presentation will address research-based and promising strategies for supporting transition-age youth and young adults with disabilities to participate meaningfully in activities and relationships that contribute to a “good life” after high school. Emphasis will be placed on strategies for engaging natural supports—like peers, families, and community members—along with formal supports to help students find success in the workplace, college, and the community.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe how to promote inclusion, learning and relationships for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities;
2. Identify ways that peer supports, families and communities contribute to successful transition;
3. List at least three formal supports helpful in promoting success for young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities;
4. Describe the significance of relevance, as it relates not only to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities, but to any young adult; and
5. Explain the current research relating to supporting transition-age youth and young adults with disabilities.

 


Lunch

11:45 to 1:00 p.m.
Colorado Room

 


Afternoon Workshops

Titles with * are designed with special focus on parents and caretakers Titles with ** are designed with special focus on professionals

*Bullying and Social Media: Parent Strategies

Robert Grant, PhD

1:00 to 2:00 p.m.
Iowa Room

This workshop will focus on cyber bullying issues. Current literature related to cyber bullying issues will be presented. The context of social media forums and bullying will be presented and discussed. The impact of cyber bullying will be reviewed along with ways to educate and protect children and adolescents from cyber bullying.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will identify popular social media sites and examples of bullying through social media;
2. Participants will learn strategies for educating their children on how to recognize and respond to cyber bullying; and
3. Participants will learn legal and advocacy support for addressing bullying issues.

 


**Supporting Families to Chart Their Life Course

Michelle Reynolds, PhD

1:00 to 2:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

Individuals with disabilities and families are resilient and strong but at times need assistance with exploring and planning for supports that can assist them to achieve or create the lives they want. Using the life course framework, this presentation will provide hands on tools and strategies professionals can use when supporting individuals and families with disabilities. We will also siscuss how Missouri Family to Family is putting it into practice and how you can get involved.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe a framework for supporting real lives;
2. Identify tools and strategies for supporting individuals with disabilities and their families; and
3. Analyze a new agenda for supports to individuals and their families across the life course.

 


*Don’t Take the Wrong Path for Your Special Needs Family

Lois M. Zerrer, JD

2:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Iowa Room

It is important for families and professionals to be familiar with the special legal issues which arise for a family with special needs. Estate planning is important for every family, but special need families need special plans. We will discuss the basic legal documents required for any well prepared family. Plus, we will cover numerous topics such as nominating a guardian for your child; obtaining guardianship at age 18; how to financially protect a special needs child; and what happens if these protections are not in place. An attorney who is well versed in these matters is not a “spare tire”, but an important part of a good “tool kit” to help a family get down the right path.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. What legal documents a person should have to prepare for potential incapacity;
2. How to prepare for the time when you can no longer care for a loved one; and
3. Legal ramifications for not having a plan in place for an incapacitated family member.

 


**Therapeutically Addressing Bullying Issues for Children with Special Needs

Robert Grant, PhD

2:00 to 3:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

This workshop focuses on how to therapeutically address children and adolescents with special needs who are dealing with and have become victims of bullying. An overview of the prevalence and impact of bullying will be presented. Strategies and interventions for helping children and adolescents with special needs manage bullying will be discussed and presented.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to list bullying types and the potential mental health impact created by bullying;
2. Participants will be able to describe special considerations in regard to children with special needs who are bullied; and
3. Participants will identify strategies to assist children with special needs who have experienced or are currently experiencing bullying.

 


*Charting Your Life Course

Michelle Reynolds, PhD

3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Iowa Room

Using the life course framework, this presentation will encourage everyone to think beyond their current understanding about disability. Easy to use tools will be used to describe a new agenda for supports to individuals and their families across the life span, along with ideas on how to begin creating a positive trajectory towards one’s future.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Challenge your beliefs and understanding;
2. Understand the impact of history on disability;
3. Understand the role of family in supporting a loved one with a disability;
4. Understand a new agenda for supports to individuals and their families across the life course; and
5. Overview a framework for supporting real lives and learn how MoF2F is putting it into practice.

 


**Suicide Prevention and Disability

Speaker TBD

3:00 to 4:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

Disability is not a category of disease, but rather relates to the physical, sensory, cognitive and/or mental disorders that substantially limit one or more major life activities. These functional limitations have been found to be predictive of suicide, with psychiatric co-occurring disorders increasing the risk for suicide. While the research is still limited, it is felt that large gaps exist in the understanding of the relationship between disability and suicide. This workshop will explore not only the rates of suicide, but also identification of suicide risk factors, including factors more common for individuals with intellectual disabilities. It will also describe the methods used to prevent suicide to help children and adults with disabilities to lead happier, healthier and longer lives.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Describe how intellectual disability can contribute to a higher rate of suicide;
2. Identify suicide risk factors, including those more common for individuals with intellectual disabilities; and
3. Explain the best practices in preventing suicide among this vulnerable population.

 


**AutPlay® Therapy: A Basic Introduction

Robert Grant, PhD

4:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Georgia Room

This workshop presents an introduction to AutPlay Therapy, a play therapy based treatment approach for children and adolescents with autism and other neurodevelopmental disorders. The AutPlay process and methodology will be presented. Target treatment areas and treatment planning will be discussed. An overview of the parent training component will be presented and several structured play therapy based interventions will be discussed and demonstrated.

Specific Goals and Learning Objectives:

1. Participants will be able to describe an overview of the AutPlay process including sequence of treatment, assessment protocol, and treatment planning;
2. Participants will be able to identify target treatment areas of AutPlay; and
3. Participants will be able to discuss and participate in several structured play based interventions.

 


Ellis

Robert Grant, PhD

is a Registered Play Therapist Supervisor and Certified Autism Specialist, He owns and operates a private practice clinic in Nixa, MO. Dr. Grant regularly presents workshops on autism and play therapy around the country. He is the author of the AutPlay Therapy Handbook, Play Based Interventions for Autism, ADHD, Neurodevelopmental Disorders, and Other Developmental Disabilities, and More Play Based Interventions for Autism, ADHD, Neurodevelopmental Disorders, and Other Developmental Disabilities.


Ellis

David Baker, BA, MA, CAP

has been working in the field of assistive technology for nearly 20 years. In that time, he has developed a broad background in assistive technology that has seen him involved in areas ranging from consultation to program development, and from training to policy implementation. His current emphasis is on the utilization of i-devices and similar tablet computers as assistive technology tools in schools, on the job and in the community.


Ellis

Amy Vaughan, OTR/L, BCP

is a licensed occupational therapist with Burrell Behavioral Health, and the lead occupational therapist for the OT department at Burrell. She is Board Certified in Pediatrics through the National Board of Certification in Occupational Therapy and has practiced as a pediatric therapist for over 14 years. She is a member of the Autism Center assessment team. She is a graduate of the University of Kansas, and certified in sensory integration testing. She is also certified to use Interactive Metronome as well as Integrated Listening System tools and is certified in early intervention using the DIR © (Developmental, Individual differences, Relationship-based) method of treatment. She brings years of experience in sensory processing strategies and occupational therapy intervention with children. She has trained hundreds of individuals in pediatric therapy theory and practical application through seminars, teaching a college level pediatric course, and as a former module trainer for the Missouri First Steps Program. In 2011, Amy Vaughan was recognized by the Springfield Business Journal for their 40 Under 40 Award and for their 20 Most Influential Women in Southwest Missouri Award.


Ellis

Richard White, MA

has a Master’s Degree in teaching, a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology with a minor in theatre. His employment history includes five years as a classroom teacher, two years as a Vocational Coordinator and seven years working in the developmental disability field. He is trained in the “Tools for Choice Positive Behavior Training System” and “Seven Keys to Unlock Autism”.


Ellis

Jamie McGranahan, BS

BS holds a degree in Human Services. She served on the Behavior Resource Team at the Springfield Regional Office for eight years. She is a Master Trainer in the “Tools for Choice Positive Behavior Training System” and is trained in “Seven Keys to Unlock Autism”. While at the Regional Office, Jamie also served as the Autism Navigator. She has been a member of the National Forensic League and has received several awards for vocal music performance; she has also performed in productions with Springfield Little Theatre. Jamie has a son who has autism; she has provided training and support for individuals with autism, their parents, teachers, and staff for many years.


Ellis

Kelly Shifflet, BS

has a bachelor’s degree in Child and Family Development and has worked in the developmental disability field for over twenty years. She is trained in the “Tools for Choice Positive Behavior Training System” and “Seven Keys to Unlock Autism”. She has developed trainings and has trained parents and professionals in positive behavior support, adaptive curriculum, preparation for school, working in cooperation with schools in the IEP process, alternative reading programs, and preparation for transitions. She has a fourteen-year-old son who has Down syndrome.


Ellis

Michelle Reynolds, PhD

has served as the Director of Individual Advocacy and Family Support at UMKC Institute for Human Development, a University Center on Excellence in Developmental Disabilities for the last 16 years, where she is directly responsible for projects that directly impact the lives of self-advocates and their families through both policy and practice changes. She has also had the privilege of providing technical assistance to the self-advocacy organizations for Missouri and the nation for over 12 years. Dr. Reynolds received her doctorate in Public Administration and Sociology from the University of Missouri, Kansas City, with a focus on family support research and policy for families of individuals with developmental disabilities across the lifespan. Dr. Reynolds’ passion, knowledge and experience come from growing up as a sibling of a younger brother with developmental disabilities.


Ellis

Lois M. Zerrer, JD

practices Elder Law, Probate, and Estate Planning. She received her J.D. degree from the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1984. She is a member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, and a former president of the Missouri Chapter of NAELA. She is a member and former Chair of The Missouri Bar Elder Law Committee. She also serves on The Missouri Bar Probate and Trust Committee and the Springfield Metropolitan Bar Association Probate Committee. She is a frequent speaker on Elder Law issues at business, professional and social organizations in Springfield and Southwest Missouri. She is a volunteer lawyer with Legal Services of Southern Missouri and is a recipient of the Pro Bono Publico Award from The Missouri Bar. Lois was invited to membership in the Special Needs Alliance, a national collective of attorneys dedicated to disability and public benefits law. She is member of the Public Policy Committee which advocates for legislation to benefit special needs clientele. Lois has served on several city and community boards. She is an Elder at First and Calvary Presbyterian Church. She previously served as Chair of the Board of the Alzheimer’s Association of Southwest Missouri and has served on the Board of the Springfield Workshop, Inc. She was appointed by Governor Nixon to serve as the elder law attorney member of the Alzheimer’s State Plan Task Force for the State of Missouri.


Ellis

Erik Carter, PhD

is an Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education at Vanderbilt University. His research and teaching focuses on strategies for supporting meaningful school inclusion and promoting valued roles in school, work, and community settings for children and adults with intellectual disability, and other developmental disabilities. He has co-authored six books—including The New Transition Handbook: Strategies Secondary School Teachers Use that Work (Brookes Publishing), Peer Support Strategies: Improving all Students’ Social Lives and Learning (Brookes Publishing), and Including People with Disabilities in Faith Communities: A Guide for Service Providers, Families, and Congregations. He has co-authored more than 100 articles and book chapters and was the recipient of the Distinguished Early Career Research Award from the Council for Exceptional Children, the Early Career Award from the American Association for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, and the Patricia Sitlington Research Award from the Division on Career Development and Transition.


Ellis

Rachel Simon

is the award-winning author of six books and a nationally-recognized public speaker on issues related to diversity and disability. Her titles include the bestsellers The Story of Beautiful Girl and Riding The Bus With My Sister. Both books are frequent selections of book clubs and school reading programs around the country. Rachel’s work has been adapted for theater, NPR, the Lifetime Channel, and Hallmark Hall of Fame, whose adaptation of Riding The Bus With My Sister starred Rosie O’ Donnell and Andie McDowell, and was directed by Anjelica Huston.


Ellis

Jane St. John

is a Community Inclusion Specialist with Missouri Family-to-Family at the UMKC-Institute for Human Development, UCEDD, and is a graduate of Missouri’s Partners in Policymaking program. Her areas of expertise include Family Support, Inclusion, Family Leadership and Alternatives to Guardianship. Jane is a co-trainer for the Missouri Guardianship: Understanding Your Options and Alternatives initiative, and currently serves on MO-WINGS, Missouri’s guardianship statutory reform task force. She also serves on the boards of The Arc of Missouri and Mo-AAIDD (Missouri’s chapter of the American Association for Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities). Jane is the parent of 3 young men, (23 year old twin sons and a 27 year old step-son). Jane’s son Ben has a developmental disability and lives in the family home. Ben, with the assistance of his parents, self directs his services through the Division of Developmental Disabilities. Ben loves being out and about in the community, helping coach the high school football team, and volunteering at the local fire department, where he is an honorary captain. Jane and her family made the decision to pursue alternatives to guardianship for Ben, in order to facilitate supported decision making and self-determination.

Hotel Reservations

RamadaThe Working with Angry & Resistant Youth Conference will be held at the University Plaza Hotel Convention Center, Springfield, Missouri

Located in the heart of downtown Springfield – surrounded by great restaurants, lounges and coffee shops – this first class hotel has terrific resort-style amenities like a fitness center, whirlpool, sundeck and indoor and outdoor pools.

Special Room Rates

We have special room rates for conference at $89 (plus applicable taxes) single/double.

Call the reservations department at 417.864.7333 and be sure to ask for the Burrell New Frontiers conference block to receive the discounted conference rate.

NOTE: Rooms at the special rate are subject to availability and sell out quickly! Hotel reservations are separate from conference registration and must be booked and paid for separately.

University Plaza

See their website and take a tour of the hotel at: http://www.upspringfield.com/

University Plaza Hotel
333 John Q. Hammons Parkway
Springfield MO 65806

Hotel Phone: 417.864.7333
Hotel Fax: 417.831.5893